Visiting someone having chemo

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by JulieH JulieH 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #1116

    cacarroll
    Participant

    Hi guys my mother in law has just received a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia she lives in the U.K. and obviously we are very worried about her and want to go over to be with her and her husband as they have no family over there BUT I’m worried about visiting her while she is immune compromised especially after being in a plane so my question is when would be the best time to vist now at the beginning of her treatment or in 2 weeks after the chemo is finished we are not sure if she will be receiving a stem cell transplant or not and if she does she will be isolated in hospital right???? So visiting her then would also not be really ok I’m just so worried and a bit confused as to what we should do any advice much appreciated
    Thanks

    #1118
    JulieH
    JulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to CancerChatNZ. Thanks for your message.
    I’m very sorry to hear about your mother-in-law’s diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia. Yes it must be tough for them with no family in the UK. It can be really tricky to know just when to visit as you say she will be immunocompromised from her chemo.
    General advice is to ensure that you are well when you visit – as you are flying you may want to wait a few days after arriving to recover from the trip and know that you are in good health before you visit.
    Yes she will be in hospital if she has a stem cell transplant so it may be easier to visit before this takes place.
    Visits especially from close family can be a real boost to both patient and carer but again, general advice is that it’s good to check with them first that they are happy to have visitors. It may be that she is very tired from treatment – fatigue is a common side effect, so keeping visits short can be a good idea.
    Carers often tell us how tired they are with the emotional worry plus the physical caring they are doing for the patient. Her husband may appreciate having a break to take some time out while you visit, spending some time with a friend or getting some things done that he’s been too busy to do.
    So overall, taking the lead from them on when, and for long they are happy to have visits may be a good strategy and possibly it’s best to go before the stem cell transplant (if this does go ahead). Just note too that she may be immunocompromised for several weeks after chemo finishes, if you go then.
    I hope this helps and best wishes for your visit.
    Julie – cancer information nurse.

    #1119
    JulieH
    JulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to CancerChatNZ. Thanks for your message.
    I’m very sorry to hear about your mother-in-law’s diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia. Yes it must be tough for them with no family in the UK. It can be really tricky to know just when to visit as you say she will be immunocompromised from her chemo.
    General advice is to ensure that you are well when you visit – as you are flying you may want to wait a few days after arriving to recover from the trip and know that you are in good health before you visit.
    Yes she will be in hospital if she has a stem cell transplant so it may be easier to visit before this takes place.
    Visits especially from close family can be a real boost to both patient and carer but again, general advice is that it’s good to check with them first that they are happy to have visitors. It may be that she is very tired from treatment – fatigue is a common side effect, so keeping visits short can be a good idea.
    Carers often tell us how tired they are with the emotional worry plus the physical caring they are doing for the patient. Her husband may appreciate having a break to take some time out while you visit, spending some time with a friend or getting some things done that he’s been too busy to do.
    So overall, taking the lead from them on when, and for long they are happy to have visits may be a good strategy and possibly it’s best to go before the stem cell transplant (if this does go ahead). Just note too that she may be immunocompromised for several weeks after chemo finishes, if you go then.
    I hope this helps and best wishes for your visit.
    Julie – cancer information nurse.

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