JulieH

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Cancer and Covid19 #1712
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Diana,
    Thank you for your post and welcome to CancerChatNZ!
    Yes these certainly are unusual times we’re living in. What we’ve heard from our medical director Dr Chris Jackson is that cancer services are considered essential and will be going ahead as usual – there may be changes such as having phone consultations with your oncologist instead of seeing them in the clinic.
    Regarding scans these may be done but there possibly are delays. His advice is for any questions about your appointments you should contact your cancer treatment team. So if you have contact details for the service caring for you we suggest you email or phone them – perhaps there is a cancer specialist nurse in your team who can follow this up for you. If you are finding this difficult please let us know – either info@cancersoc.org.nz or ph 0800 CANCER(226 237).
    Best wishes, Julie, Naena and Anna, Cancer information nurses, and CancerChat NZ moderators.

    in reply to: Bladder Cancer #1628
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi again
    Another suggestion to try for tips and support is the Cancer Council Australia forum https://onlinecommunity.cancercouncil.com.au/ – they are similar to us in NZ but more people!
    Again, we wish you all the very best for your surgery.
    Julie

    in reply to: Bladder Cancer #1622
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to the CancerChatNZ forum,
    Thank you for posting – this sounds like a tough time for you and I imagine having no hospital visitors after your surgery will add to the very understandable stress.
    I hope you will receive some replies and tips from other here – in the meantime you may like to read the info from Cancer Research UK https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/bladder-cancer/treatment/invasive/surgery/after-surgery.
    The Swedish Cancer Society https://www.cancerfonden.se/has information and support services locally so may be useful too.
    Very best wishes for your surgery and recovery.
    Julie, Naena and Anna- Cancer Information Nurses and moderators

    in reply to: Radiotherapy fatigue #1618
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Anna,
    Welcome to Cancer ChatNZ and thank you for posting here. I’m sorry to hear you are struggling with fatigue – it is very common after cancer treatment and can continue for some time. It will be good to hear from others with tips for coping.
    Some general advice is that regular moderate intensity exercise (ie. exercise that increases your heart rate and breathing)can improve fatigue. A good balanced diet is important, as is getting enough sleep. Many people find relaxation exercises and yoga helpful overall.
    Managing what you do according to the ‘three Ps’ – Plan, Prioritise and Pace yourself, can be a good way to avoid exhaustion. Try to set realistic goals for things you can achieve rather than feeling bad about what you can’t do, may be useful too.
    You are very welcome to phone or email us – the cancer information nurses on 0800 CANCER (226237) or info@cancersoc.org.nz for more discussion or to find local support services.

    in reply to: ShesDying #1605
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi J,

    Thank you for posting on CancerChatNZ. I’m very sorry to read about your wife’s situation. It sounds very tough for you indeed.
    Sometimes writing how you feel can be a good way to cope with overwhelming sadness so it’s good that you’ve written here.It sounds like you are experiencing a type of grief known as anticipatory grief – this link describes this in more detail https://www.cancercare.org/publications/385-anticipatory_grief_preparing_for_a_loved_one_s_end_of_life
    It can be helpful to have some counselling for coping strategies – you are welcome to call the cancer information nurses on 0800 CANCER(226237) to ask about counselling in your local area, or email us at info@cancersoc.org.nz

    in reply to: Help struggling with what to do #1501
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to Cancer Chat NZ. I’m sorry to read of your dilemma – this must be a tough time for you. Does your Dad have other support close by? Sometimes it can help to find out more about the type of treatments he may be having and support services in place for him – perhaps with his permission you could go to a doctor’s appointment with him or arrange to contact his doctor to get an idea of what may be ahead for your Dad? Cancer Society offices around NZ have support staff you can talk things over with. Sometimes in situations like this counselling can be helpful to assist with decision-making, and learning coping strategies.
    You are really welcome to call the Cancer information nurses 0800 CANCER (226 237) or email us at info@cancersoc.org.nz
    Best wishes,
    Julie, Cancer Information Nurse

    in reply to: Visiting my Nana #1499
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Jekka,
    I’m sorry to hear of your Nana’s cancer diagnosis – sounds like a tough time for your family.I imagine your Nana and Grandad are looking forward to your visit – you will be a welcome distraction from chemo and hospital visits. The best thing when you’re there is to take your cues from them -spend time with them, maybe reading to your Nana, or going for a short walk with her if she would like that. You may find this list of suggestions helpful: https://www.cancer.org/treatment/understanding-your-diagnosis/talking-about-cancer/listen-with-your-heart/talking-tips.html
    Maybe they need practical help eg some meal or snack preparation (smoothies, soup etc), shopping to stock up the pantry, lawn mowing??
    I hope your visit goes well – you are also welcome to call us (cancer information nurses on 0800 CANCER(226 237) if you need.
    Best wishes,
    Julie, cancer information nurse

    in reply to: Feeling very alone in my cancer struggle #1325
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Thank you for your honest and heartfelt post. Sometimes it is difficult for family watching someone they love going through tough times like this. They may not want to impose or may not know what to do. At times like this being really clear about what you need can be very helpful.
    It can be really difficult to ask for help but reading other people’s minds or expecting them to read our mind often leads to confusion or resentment as we often get it wrong. In these situations clarity of your expectations and needs, and clarity from your family of what they can or can’t provide helps everyone know what is going on.

    Viv

    in reply to: Mothering an adult cancer ‘patient’ #1233
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi motheroffour,
    Thank you very much for posting on CancerChatNZ. I’m so sorry to hear of your daughter’s situation – it sounds very tough for all of you.I can only imagine how hard it’s been for her to give up a lot of her independence, and for you and your husband it must be hard to be in the caring role and seeing the way people act so differently towards her when she is in a chair. It is wonderful that you are able to provide such loving and respectful care for her, but yes it’s very normal to yearn for the way things ‘used to be’. You mentioned going to ‘dark places’ – again understandable, but I wonder if it might be useful to seek some counselling to gain some strategies to manage this? We find this to be helpful for other carers we work with. You could call the cancer information nurses on 0800 CANCER to find out about support locally for you.Your daughter may be interested in this too? Another suggestion is for you to check out the CarersNZ website http://carers.net.nz/ – they have great support resources. Please don’t hesitate to post again and we hope you get replies from others as well.
    Very best wishes,
    Julie, Cancer Information Nurse

    in reply to: The love of my life is dying #1188
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Blessmyange,
    I’m so sorry to hear of Angel’s diagnosis of glioblastoma – it is so hard living with this raw grief and being supportive to Angel as well. I wonder if you would like to call us – the cancer information nurses on 0800CANCER (226 237) – we are happy to talk and have lots of resources we can suggest that may be helpful.
    Take care,
    Julie
    Cancer info nurse

    in reply to: The love of my life is dying #1187
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Blessmyange,
    I’m so sorry to hear of Angel’s diagnosis of glioblastoma – it is so hard living with this raw grief and being supportive to Angel as well. I wonder if you would like to call us – the cancer information nurses on 0800CANCER (226 237) – we are happy to talk and have lots of resources we can suggest that may be helpful.
    Take care,
    Julie
    Cancer info nurse

    in reply to: Ungreatful husband hires pro #1183
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Bubbles4900, Thanks for your post.I’m sorry you’re having such a tough time. It is a very difficult situation when the people who we trust the most let us down in such a significant way. Having friends and family to support you at this time is really important, it may be really helpful to find someone to talk this through with.
    Best wishes,
    Viv

    in reply to: Cancer and life #1149
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi Debbie, Than you for your message and welcome to CancerChatNZ. I’m sorry you’re having such a tough time. You’ve had a lot to deal with in a short period of time and it sounds quite overwhelming.Even though you didn’t need further treatment after surgery just the diagnosis of cancer itself can have a huge impact on your life. I wonder if you’ve found any support groups – sometimes meeting others going through a similar experience can be helpful. I hope you may get some replies from others here and you are also welcome to call us – the nurses on the Cancer Helpline 0800 CANCER (226 237).
    Best wishes,
    Julie

    in reply to: Visiting someone having chemo #1119
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to CancerChatNZ. Thanks for your message.
    I’m very sorry to hear about your mother-in-law’s diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia. Yes it must be tough for them with no family in the UK. It can be really tricky to know just when to visit as you say she will be immunocompromised from her chemo.
    General advice is to ensure that you are well when you visit – as you are flying you may want to wait a few days after arriving to recover from the trip and know that you are in good health before you visit.
    Yes she will be in hospital if she has a stem cell transplant so it may be easier to visit before this takes place.
    Visits especially from close family can be a real boost to both patient and carer but again, general advice is that it’s good to check with them first that they are happy to have visitors. It may be that she is very tired from treatment – fatigue is a common side effect, so keeping visits short can be a good idea.
    Carers often tell us how tired they are with the emotional worry plus the physical caring they are doing for the patient. Her husband may appreciate having a break to take some time out while you visit, spending some time with a friend or getting some things done that he’s been too busy to do.
    So overall, taking the lead from them on when, and for long they are happy to have visits may be a good strategy and possibly it’s best to go before the stem cell transplant (if this does go ahead). Just note too that she may be immunocompromised for several weeks after chemo finishes, if you go then.
    I hope this helps and best wishes for your visit.
    Julie – cancer information nurse.

    in reply to: Visiting someone having chemo #1118
    AvatarJulieH
    Keymaster

    Hi and welcome to CancerChatNZ. Thanks for your message.
    I’m very sorry to hear about your mother-in-law’s diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia. Yes it must be tough for them with no family in the UK. It can be really tricky to know just when to visit as you say she will be immunocompromised from her chemo.
    General advice is to ensure that you are well when you visit – as you are flying you may want to wait a few days after arriving to recover from the trip and know that you are in good health before you visit.
    Yes she will be in hospital if she has a stem cell transplant so it may be easier to visit before this takes place.
    Visits especially from close family can be a real boost to both patient and carer but again, general advice is that it’s good to check with them first that they are happy to have visitors. It may be that she is very tired from treatment – fatigue is a common side effect, so keeping visits short can be a good idea.
    Carers often tell us how tired they are with the emotional worry plus the physical caring they are doing for the patient. Her husband may appreciate having a break to take some time out while you visit, spending some time with a friend or getting some things done that he’s been too busy to do.
    So overall, taking the lead from them on when, and for long they are happy to have visits may be a good strategy and possibly it’s best to go before the stem cell transplant (if this does go ahead). Just note too that she may be immunocompromised for several weeks after chemo finishes, if you go then.
    I hope this helps and best wishes for your visit.
    Julie – cancer information nurse.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
Positive SSL